The Parthenon in Athens

January 17, 2011

Our previous post referenced the Apostle Paul’s preaching in Athens as recorded in Acts 17:16-34. Up from the Areopagus was the Parthenon. The Parthenon was the temple devoted to the virgin Greek goddess Athena, of Greek mythology, goddess of wisdom and the arts.

The Parthenon in Athens. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

 

This temple was constructed with eight Doric columns in front and rear, and seventeen along each side. Within the Parthenon stood a thirty-four feet high statue of Athena, built by the sculptor Pheidias. It was made of wood with ivory additions and a plating of gold.

The city of Athens was said to be “full of idols,” (Acts 17:16), but it may well be that Paul had in mind especially the nearby Parthenon when he proclaimed,

The God who made the world and everything in it is the Lord of heaven and earth and does not live in temples built by hands. Nor is He worshiped with men’s hands, as though He needed anything, since He gives to all life, breath, and all things.

He went on to say in v. 29,

Therefore, since we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Divine Nature is like gold or silver or stone, something shaped by art and man’s devising.

We plan to continue with more of the sites in Athens.

My friend & fellow-worker Ferrell Jenkins is currently directing a tour in Egypt. To keep up with their travels, and see the photos to be posted, see Ferrell’s Travel Blog. Link is provided to your right under Blogroll.

Remember to click on image for higher resolution.


Aphek/Antipatris

October 15, 2010

Aphek is mentioned in 1 Sam. 4:1 as the site of the Philistine camp as they prepared for battle against Israel.  This was in the last days of Eli’s tenure as High Priest and Judge of Israel.

Holman’s Bible Dictionary has this info on Aphek:

Place-name meaning “bed of brook or river” or “fortress.”  City whose king Joshua defeated (Josh. 12:18), where Philistine armies formed to face Israel in days of Samuel (1 Sam. 4:1) resulting in Philistine victory and capture of Israel’s ark of the covenant. Philistine armies including David and his men gathered in Aphek to fight Saul. The Philistine commanders forced Achish to send David back from battle (1 Sam. 29). Eventually the Philistines defeated Israel, bringing death to Saul and Jonathan. Aphek is located at modern Tell Ras elʹ Ain near the source of the Yarkon River in the Sharon plain northeast of Joppa. Egyptian execration texts from about 1900 B.C. apparently refer to Aphek.

Our photo below gives an aerial view of Aphek. Click on image for higher resolution.

 

Aerial of Aphek. This was NT Antipatris. Photo ©Leon Mauldin.

 

In the New Testament this location was known as Antipatris, and is mentioned in Acts 23.  When the Roman commander Claudius Lysias became aware of an assassination plot to kill the Apostle Paul in Jerusalem, he order a military escort of Paul to Caesarea.  This was for Paul’s own protection.  The commander was thorough: two centurions were commanded to prepare 200 soldiers, 200 spearmen, and 70 horsemen.  The Roman militia departed at 9:00 PM (Acts 23:23). On the way to Caesarea, the governor’s residence, they went through Antipatris: “Then the soldiers, as they were commanded, took Paul and brought him by night to Antipatris” (v.31). The next day the horsemen went on with Paul to his destination, whereas the soldiers returned to the barracks (v.32) at Jerusalem.

On another (personal) note, I mentioned in a previous post that we were currently conducting a meeting at Pine Lane, Birmingham, which concluded last night.  On Wed PM our granddaughter was with my wife and me. One of the members there took this photo:

 

 

Leon & Granddaughter.