San Jacinto Monument

October 7, 2011

While here in Texas for our series of lessons we want to smell the roses, or see the monuments, as the case may be.

San Jacinto Monument. Click for larger view. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

From Wikipedia:

The San Jacinto Monument is a 567.31-foot (172.92 m) high column located on the Houston Ship Channel in Harris County, Texas near the city of La Porte. The monument is topped with a 220-ton star that commemorates the site of the Battle of San Jacinto, the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. The monument, constructed between 1936 and 1939 and dedicated on April 21, 1939, is the world’s tallest monumental column and is part of the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site. By comparison, the Washington Monument is 555.427 feet (169.294 m) tall. The column is an octagonal shaft faced with Texas Cordova shellstone, topped with a 34-foot (10 m) Lone Star—the symbol of Texas. Visitors can take an elevator to the monument’s observation deck for a view of Houston and the USS Texas.

The San Jacinto Museum of History is located inside the base of the monument, and focuses on the history of the Battle of San Jacinto and Texas culture and heritage.

The San Jacinto Battlefield, of which the monument is a part, was designated a National Historic Landmark on December 19, 1960, and is therefore also automatically listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It was designated an Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 1992.

I had always heard that everything is bigger in Texas.

San Jacinto Monument. Closer View. Photo by Leon Mauldin.

Tonight will conclude our series of lessons at Southside in Pasadena, a suburb of Houston. We have really enjoyed being with the folks here.